Crowjar CH>1

BARNABY TAYLOR

IMG_0700Small lithe limbs passing smoothly over the balustrade as Crowjar slips unseen onto the sloping roof>upwards in the shadow as the city lays deep in a midnight dream>each window Crowjar passes is an invitation into the lives of the people sleeping but she has no time now>no time at all>if she had the time Crowjar would like to watch and wonder what it was that people worried about in their sleep>but she is late and has to hurry>

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WATERMEN’S STORY SWAP- CHARLES BRYAN

easternshorebrent

0cbcharles bryan

On Friday, February 24th, at Grasonville VFW Post 7464, the Queen Anne’s County Watermen’s Association will present  a Watermen’s Story Swap. The program will feature a panel of local watermen telling stories from both the past and present, but will also include a number of exhibits relevant to the local seafood industry, such as vintage photographs and artifacts watermen have found while harvesting the waters of the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Noted Working the Water photographer and author Jay Fleming will participate in the program, Karen Oertel from Harris Crab House and W.H. Harris Seafood will be celebratingthe 70th Anniversary of the last seafood packing house in Kent Narrows, and I will emcee the event.The event is free and open to the public.

One of the watermen on our panel will be Charles Bryan.

Born on Marshy Creek in Grasonville in 1932, Charles Bryan has been working on the water since he was 11 or…

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Becoming Unbecoming

What should I read next?

51wt0vz4fkl-_sx371_bo1204203200_By Una

‘Becoming Unbecoming’ is a new graphic novel that deals with violence against women in a personal way. Author Una takes a public experience (the 1977 Yorkshire Ripper killings) and ties them to her own experiences of violence and abuse. The author takes on victim-blaming and other cultural attitudes that enable violence against women, and masterfully blends facts and statistics with her story to create a call to listen to and value women’s voices.

The book looks good as well. The drawings are beautiful, most gray, black, and white with splashes of color when needed. Una finds a way to make even simple drawings powerful, particularly at the end. Even if you aren’t a fan of graphic novels, I would recommend checking this out- it may lead you to re-evaluate the medium.

Interested in this book? Get it here!

Reviewed by BiblioMecha

BiblioMecha

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