Seven Day Challenge – Day 1

Images from Finchley

On Facebook I found myself nominated for a challenge. Normally I ignore challenges on Facebook. In fact I went absent from Facebook for several years because the number of ‘play my game’ requests was frankly annoying 😦 However, that problem seems to have become less prevalent. I decided to accept this challenge only because the nominator was my fellow Wingate & Finchley photographer David and I guess he has the right to stitch me up 😉 The challenge is as follows: –

Seven days, seven black and white photos of your life. No people. No explanation. Nominate someone every day.

I have declined to nominate anyone myself as David is nominating some of the people I might have considered and I don’t really want to inflict this on my other friends.

Ok explanation over – here’s the first shot for the challenge but as this is my blog, unlike the…

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A cozy brownstone at the end of the block

e daggar art: THE MUSEUM

Once again I missed my Thursday post. I was at work late. We were shooting a little set up of cut paper buildings for a campaign, and they reminded me of this illustration I did for a holiday card a few years ago, which has sort of the look of cut paper.

Below is a close up (in black and white) of part of the scene we shot last night. One of my co-workers and I spent the batter part of two days cutting and assembling the layered structures.

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A Perfect Match: How Education Can Fit Around Your Life

Some great ideas!

lifewithlilred

When you think back on your life, achievements that can really change your circumstances are some of the most important changes you can make. If you feel that you have more to give and would like to go back to college or start studying again, you can make it happen. With work and family commitments, many people write it off as a pipe dream. But with today’s flexible educations styles and virtual platforms, it doesn’t have to be a choice – you can fit your continuing education goals into your life. Studying for a degree while also having a career, especially if you work irregular hours, can certainly be a challenge, but putting a little thought into your approach can make it work.

Many institutions recognize that people are wanting to study later in life and have designed programs specifically for working adults. These are structured flexibly from purely…

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Al Franken joins long list of lawmakers ousted by scandal

United Press and Channel 8

Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota announced on Thursday that he will resign in the face of multiple allegations of sexual misconduct. He joins a long list of lawmakers ousted by scandal.

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— Rep. Trent Franks, R-Ariz. Is retiring next month after revealing that he discussed surrogacy with two female staffers.

— Rep. John Conyers, D-Mich. Retired abruptly Tuesday amid sexual harassment allegations by former staff members. The 88-year-old Conyers was the longest-serving House member.

— Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa. Resigned in October after the anti-abortion lawmaker allegedly urged his mistress to end a pregnancy.

— Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y. Resigned in 2011 after posting lewd pictures of himself on Twitter. He initially claimed he had been hacked, then admitted to sexting with various women. He later was sent to prison after he was caught sexting with a teenage girl.

— Rep. David Wu, D-Ore., Resigned in 2011 after he was accused of sexually harassing the 18-year-old daughter of a political donor.

— Sen. John Ensign, R-Nev. Resigned in 2011 after admitting to an affair with the wife of his chief of staff. Ensign was accused of helping the husband get a job as a lobbyist to try to keep him quiet.

— Rep. Eric Massa, D-N.Y. Resigned in 2010 after he was accused of sexually harassing male staffers in his congressional office, including engaging in unwanted tickling.

— Rep. Mark Souder, R-Ind. Resigned in 2010 after admitting to an affair with a female staffer.

— Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla. Resigned in 2006 after media reports that he engaged in sexually explicit instant message conversations with teenage, male congressional pages. At least 10 people came forward to allege that Foley had sexually harassed them or made inappropriate sexual comments.

— Rep. Robert Livingston, R-La. Announced his resignation in late 1998 after being chosen as the next House speaker, citing adulterous affairs. Livingston shocked his colleagues by announcing his decision to the House as it debated the impeachment of President Bill Clinton. He left Congress in March 1999.

— Rep. Mel Reynolds, D-Ill. Resigned in 1995 after being convicted of sexual assault, statutory rape and other charges stemming from a sexual relationship with an underage campaign worker.

— Sen. Bob Packwood, R-Ore. Resigned in 1995 after a series of women, including former staffers and lobbyists, accused him of sexual harassment and assault. A report by the Senate Ethics Committee described Packwood’s “physical coercion” of women and “a habitual pattern of aggressive, blatantly sexual advances, mostly directed at members of his own staff.” The committee recommended his expulsion. Packwood resigned before the Senate could vote to expel him.

— Rep. Donald “Buz” Lukens, R-Ohio. Resigned in 1990 after being convicted of contributing to the unruliness of a minor for having sex with a 16-year-old girl. Lukens initially refused to resign from Congress, but was defeated in a GOP primary and later resigned.

— Rep. Jon Hinson, R-Miss. Resigned in 1981 after being arrested on sodomy charges.

— Rep. Wayne Hays, D-Ohio. Resigned in 1976 after The Washington Post reported that a 33-year-old clerk with House Administration Committee said she had been placed in her job to be his mistress.